Performance Review -Tips For Managment

smart ideas Barb picPerformance Review Tips Are Beneficial To Managers!

 


  Strike the right balance between praise and constructive criticism to achieve that elusive balance and make the review a productive one, start preparing for the next round of performance appraisals once the last round has been completed. performance reviews If you’re dissatisfied with the reviews you’ve given in the past, take steps now to improve the process before other priorities and deadlines force you to put it on the back burner. Performance reviews are a lot like walking a tightrope. If you withhold positive feedback, you’ll discourage and demoralize employees. On the other hand, if you hesitate to point out problem areas, you’ll never see improvement. ...

   

Maintain A Consistent Review Schedule


Performance appraisals should not be a one-time event. In addition to providing ongoing feedback throughout the year, let employees know what time of year that reviews typically take place. Seventy-seven percent of employees polled said they consider performance reviews valuable, so providing them with adequate time to prepare is critical. Give your staff the opportunity to identify their achievements from the past year and areas where they would like to improve. 

Keep  Files On Each Employee


Whenever you hire a new staff member or immediately after your review the performance of a long-time employee, set up a file in which you will document the good, the bad and the just-average aspects of that employee’s job performance and work habits. You can use the file not only to catalog accomplishments but also to track performance-related issues such as tardiness or consistent failure to meet deadlines. By keeping a performance file on each staff member, you won’t have to rely on memory when you find you need to discuss something that occurred months before the actual review meeting. 

Solicit Third-Party Input


Although the appraisal will be based on your observations and assessments of an employee’s performance, you shouldn’t rely solely on your own perceptions – particularly if your interactions with the individual have been limited. Seek input from colleagues and others who work closely day-to-day with the employee. Inquire about the person’s strengths, weaknesses, areas that have improved over time and special abilities. Ask specific questions. For example, how does this employee handle challenges and overcome obstacles? What contributions has he or she made to team-based projects? Does the employee seem committed to continuing professional education and skills development? Compare the feedback you receive with what you’ve directly observed. 

Allow Sufficient Time To Make An Assessment


Don’t wait until the day before the review to start tracking and critiquing a staff member’s performance – this is unfair to the individual and will not give you an accurate, comprehensive picture of his or her abilities and achievements. Instead, try to observe the employee in a variety of situations over an extended period of time. Ideally, you want to see how well he or she manages both independent and collaborative assignments. 

Create A Conducive Setting


Choose a quiet, private place for the review and try to schedule it at a time when interruptions can be kept at a minimum. When structuring the session, incorporate time for a two-way dialogue so that the employee can respond to your feedback and offer input of his or her own. To prepare for the meeting, organize all documentation – previous evaluations,  comments you’ve gleaned from colleagues and your own notes. Give the employee sufficient advance notice so that he or she can also prepare. 

Performance Reviews

Set The Appropriate Tone


The review itself should be handled in a professional manner and treated as a conversation, not a lecture. Open the discussion by talking about the employee’s accomplishments and positive attributes. When it’s time to shift to negative or problematic areas, focus not on mistakes but on ways to improve performance. Most employees will not be surprised by anything they hear during a review. However, if there’s a gap between an employee’s perceived versus actual performance, be sure to explain the difference and suggest ways performance goals might be met. As you speak with the employee, invite comments on your observations. Once you’ve reviewed past performance, begin talking about future expectations. Clarify his or her job requirements and responsibilities as these can change over time. Also inquire about the employee’s professional development goals and discuss how you both might work toward meeting them. Throughout the meeting, be courteous and tactful. If you must criticize, focus on behaviour rather than personality. Remember that encouragement is the best incentive for improvement. 

Maintain An Open Door


Because employees may need time to digest the feedback from a review, encourage them to come to you afterward if they have questions or concerns. If you show that performance is not a once-a-year issue but a matter of ongoing importance, your staff will focus less on the formal review itself and more on the feedback and guidance they received. They’ll be motivated to see feedback as help with their performance. By preparing well in advance for performance reviews and developing a systematic, consistent appraisal process, you’ll turn what could be an uncomfortable time into a chance to dialogue with team members and set goals for the future. Who knows? You and your employees may start to look forward to these feedback sessions and your employee may improve.  BestBarbara

The Evolution of Customer Service in Family Owned Businesses

smart ideas Barb picI came a cross an informative article, while browsing on LinkedIn I know will resonate with a handful of my readers. Do you own a family run business? Considering your options?

Either-way this is a must read!

 


Remember the good old days when continued Customer purchases were usually yours unless you didn’t fix a problem… 1st Generation Family Run Business Owners businesses grow from:

passing the baton

  • Investing long hours of hard work and detailed attention to Customers

  • Getting to know Customers through long conversations over dinners!

  • Loyal Customers would tell business owners when something was wrong.

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  • These Customers would complain, even make a suggestion! And wait expecting to hear back from the owner, to tell them exactly how the problem would be remedied -then offer a discount or tangible evidence that the loyalty is appreciated!

  • Lastly, where the business is Family-Run often you’ll find the 1st Generation Owners calling up the 2nd Generation (Employees) to demand that Customers problems are fixed immediately -Not just when “[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="yes" overflow="visible"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"][they] get around to it”.

   

Learn more, here's the Link...

The Evolution of Customer Service in Family Owned Businesses

Best,

Barb

 [/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Check this list out! *10 Costly Mistakes Retail Sales Staff Make*

smart ideas Barb pic Are These Things Happening In Your Store?...  See A difference In Sales Within 7 Days & Nip These 10 Costly Mistakes In The Bud!

 


  
  1. Failing To Build Rapport With Customers. From a simple greeting to a little chat about niceties; non-sales-directed small-talk goes along way for developing an easier and more open mood within-your Customers.
  2. Failing To Find-Out The Requirements Of Your Customers.unnamed-2
  3. Focusing On Their Own Agenda Instead Of The Customers.
  4. Not Giving Customers Majority Of The Air Time.
  5. Confusing "Telling" with "Selling". Not listening nor hearing what Customer's are saying.
  6. Not Knowing The Prevailing Promotions, Specials Nor Regular Prices Of Products.
  7. Not Differentiating Product/ Service/ Store/ Company Enough To Create Additional Value In The Minds Of The Customer.
  8. Selling Too Fast.  Closing before the customer is ready to buy!
  9. Fail To Address Objections Properly.  Not realizing satisfactory resolutions of objectives are the Shortest Distance to Purchase.
  10. Not Taking Advantage Of Add-On-Sales. [fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="yes" overflow="visible"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"][As soon as the main purchase is done...] Introduce an additional product/service -when Customers are the most ready to entertain more items.

Related Links:

Best Practices To Increase Sales

Boost Your Christmas Sales

Best,

Barbara[/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Day #74 - Preparing For The 4th Quarter - Part 14 of 14

Sales Targets - worth repeating:

"Sales Targets"Please check your numbers daily against last and this year’s new targets. You can turn a poor week around by putting together an in store special that will help effect your sales for that day. This is a key for you. You need to be flexible and reactive. Pay attention to what is happening in each day.I’m routing for you. If there is anything I can do to help you thru this crucial time in your business year.Barbara[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="yes" overflow="visible"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"]"Barbara Crowhurst"[/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Day #41 - How To Sell Without Being Pushy

How can my sales staff and I up-sell without coming across as pushy?

"The Hard Sell"It is my professional viewpoint that retailers and their staff aren’t too sure about their roles as sales people. You should have a realistic attitude and approach. Here are a few guidelines for you to follow:

  •  Customers have a learned behavior around being sold to, with a varied resistance based on their past experiences. For the record, people do not like pushy salespeople as your question suggests.
  • Customers walk in thinking  - “Will this retailer and staff make me feel uncomfortable about being in this store?”
  • So if in turn you, as a sales person, feel funny or uncomfortable as well there is no connection, and it all can be very awkward and a negative experience for everyone.
  • It’s time for a new view of yourselves and a new understanding of what being an effective salesperson is  - Say this with feeling “ we are not pushy”
  • A Key for you - just recently I picked up a copy of the book The Secret – it speaks to being of service in our lives. It is so true; I see this as the pivotal word to share with you, Service.  It should be the focus of what you do in your store. Owning that word and what it means will change how you are as salespeople and how you are with customers. Official Web Site of The Secret and The Power http://thesecret.tv/
  • Next, I want you to change to relationship selling. No more just a transaction. Your customer must feel that you are the only store and your staff the only salespeople they want to deal with.
  • Every person that comes in the door is open to buy. Believe it, that’s why they came into your store. Ready and open for a suggestive selling approach or in this case showing them an add on.Finally, an easy way to open the topic of an add on sale is to have an item ready to talk about. If you’re just trying add on sales for the first time and or even old hands at it.
  • Try this - whether it’s a “Staff Pick of the week” or, put your own name here for example, “Barb’s Pick of the week” – the item should be something that has been decided on by the store as being an item of relevance to customers. Put the item display close to the cash and train your staff to introduce it to customers as they check out. Practice makes perfect. It will become easier and more natural for you and your staff every time you introduce the item. I promise you, this really works. Keep this up, change the item as frequently as you need to keep the add-on offer fresh and new to even frequent shoppers. Please track your sales presentation progress and get feed back from your staff.
  • Stop thinking the word pushy.  See yourself, your store and staff as being in service to valued customers by offering products they will love to own and give as gifts.

Barbara 

Day #37 - Being Proactive, Part 3 of 4

Your  Promotional Calendar:"Promotional Calendar"

I’d like you to plan for 2 to 3 promotional events happening in your store every month that can include, sales,  special events, demos, educational programs, new product launches, special offers, parties, in store features, super clearances, and customer appreciation events. Just to name a few.Barbara

Day #24 - Add-on Sales & How They Can Meet Retailers Sales Goals

As a retail specialty store you build your business one client at a time, one interaction at a time. Let's look at achieving your sales goals.First you need to identify what you projected your sales increases to be this year."add-on sales"

  • For my purposes here, and to teach you how to calculate what your add on sales item should be, I will say you were projecting a 20% increase.
  • Next what is your average sale value? Again for teaching purposes, I will say $50.

Let's do the add on sales calculation:

  • Take my test  average  sale number of $50 and multiply it by my projected sales increase of 20% . The number we come up with is $10.
  • This means, in order to reach our overall year long sales projections of 20%, we will have to show each person that come into our store another item of a minimum of $10.

Now that was easy,  the more difficult step is to get your staff to take ownership of your sales goals and making sure they follow through with your add-on sale program each and every time they interact with a customer."Making Your Sales Target"Do your own calculations. Watch out for my next tips on this subject:

  1. Buying and Merchandising for add on sales program success
  2. Teaching your staff to sell add on sales items

 Barbara 

Day #24 - Add-on Sales & How They Can Meet Retailers Sales Goals

As a retail specialty store you build your business one client at a time, one interaction at a time. Let's look at achieving your sales goals.First you need to identify what you projected your sales increases to be this year."add-on sales"

  • For my purposes here, and to teach you how to calculate what your add on sales item should be, I will say you were projecting a 20% increase.
  • Next what is your average sale value? Again for teaching purposes, I will say $50.

Let's do the add on sales calculation:

  • Take my test  average  sale number of $50 and multiply it by my projected sales increase of 20% . The number we come up with is $10.
  • This means, in order to reach our overall year long sales projections of 20%, we will have to show each person that come into our store another item of a minimum of $10.

Now that was easy,  the more difficult step is to get your staff to take ownership of your sales goals and making sure they follow through with your add-on sale program each and every time they interact with a customer."Making Your Sales Target"Do your own calculations. Watch out for my next tips on this subject:

  1. Buying and Merchandising for add on sales program success
  2. Teaching your staff to sell add on sales items

 Barbara 

Day #19 - Traffic Counts, Why They Are Important To You

"Getting everybody counted""Retailers too often focus on increasing the volume of shoppers they bring into their stores when they should be paying more attention to the results obtained from shoppers already in the store. The customers on the premises are a lot more likely to buy something than those outside the doors."Start counting!Barbara