Uniqlo

smart ideas Barb picUniqlo: Japanese fast-fashion retailer is working with a broker to open Canadian stores


 

unnamed  201255-uniqlo-toronto

Uniqlo's choice of American locations can be considered an indication of what it wants in Canada: prime retail space on busy streets and in prominent malls. Expect large Canadian Uniqlo flagships, as well as some smaller mall-based stores. However, its cautious American expansion foreshadows what's in store for Canada, at least in the short term, as only a handful of American cities see multiple Uniqlo locations. This will change, eventually, as Uniqlo's goal is to become the world's top-selling fashion retailer. We'll explain why Uniqlo stores will open in many Canadian markets over the next several years, and we'll then discuss some of its most likely Canadian locations.

uniqloSources inform us that Uniqlo is talking to Canada's largest mall landlords as its searches for Canadian retail space. In March, the Financial Post reported that Uniqlo was in talks to open a 35,000 square foot space at Toronto's Yorkdale Shopping Centre. Toronto and Vancouver are ideal cities for the Japanese retailer: both see exceptionally high retail sales, large Asian populations, and considerable Uniqlo brand awareness. Other desirable markets include Montreal, Edmonton, Calgary, and possibly Ottawa and Winnipeg, as the company continues expanding.

You've got to read this! ...

Click on image to link to article...0311_レギンス_N15d_朝日_版o_cs3              imageBestBarbara 

Building Professional Window Displays

How to Build Professional Window Displays...A Few Great Tips

Picture courtesy of Cloud Nine Pyjamas

Picture courtesy of Cloud Nine Pyjamas

Focus Attention

 Have you ever tried to persuade someone who wasn’t really listening? It doesn’t work.People only have so much attention to give. Show a customer one product and you’re dealing with 100% of their attention. Show them two products and you’ve got only half as much attention on each. That’s called splitting attention. And the more products you add, the worse the math. Some store owners violate this principle hoping that something in the window will catch the eye. In practice, however, the normal result is to catch nothing at all. So little attention is available for any given item, the average passer by sees nothing at all.On the other hand, there’s nothing wrong with grouping related products together and selling them as a package. 

Mask Distractive Background

 What else can the customer see through your window? If they can see into the store, you must ask yourself if this is going to enhance the overall effect or detract. Depending on the setting, this could go either way.If viewing above and around the display is distractive, if it looks cluttered, use a backdrop of some sort to wall off distractions. Cover the background panel in fabric or display vinyl. This could be a large panel, or even fire-resistant seamless photography paper. 

Keep It Clean

 A dirty or dusty window display lowers not only perceived value of the product, but also the integrity and control of store management. Five minutes with a feather duster can make a huge difference. Window glass is best cleaned before the display is done, using a solution of clear ammonia and water. Wipe edges with clean paper towels or newspapers. 

Present The Correct Quantity

 Now that you’ve selected an item and limited distractions, you need to decide how many products to put on display. This decision may pivot on price. Generally speaking the less involved the customer is in the purchase of the item, the more you may want to display a volume of the items on display. For example, a potato does not require a lot of thought on the part of a buyer, whereas an expensive watch does. So display only one of the watch, but offer potatoes in a huge pile. 

Elevate

 Get your items off the ground. To put something on a pedestal or platform is to glorify it. Remember the old idiom about putting someone on a pedestal. You can cover a box in velvet or display felt, buy a plastic column from a display supply, or use a table. Never place items on the floor in a display. Make it special. Elevate.  

Use Signage

 The use of signage in a window display gives the chance to reinforce the purpose if tasteful and clever. You want your display to be as powerful as possible but since the ultimate goal is to sell there are times when the whole composition will benefit from a word or two. Or perhaps a brand name or logo positioned somewhere. In fact, there are times when the omission of the brand name would be sheer idiocy. Take, for instance, a series of window displays interpreting a new fragrance. Such a display would make no marketing sense without the name of the brand somewhere visible.But in most cases, unless you have a really good idea for a sign, leave it out. As a comparative, advertisements sometimes include a tag line or slogan. Today the rule is, unless the tag line is spectacular leave it out! Like a bad haircut or botched plastic surgery, a mediocre tag line will do more harm than good. Many advertisers don’t understand this. “What’s our slogan for this campaign?”,  they think they have to have a slogan -not true.  ... The moral of the story, use signage, ( Link to Shoppetalk to Buy! ). 

Add Trim

 Foliage, flowers, ribbon, a velvet pillow, rusty steel, a wicker basket... in the display profession, props such as these are called “trim.” Older dictionaries give a definition of trim as a, “decorative addition.”In fact, it might interest you to know that for decades, a display artist in the apparel industry was called a “trimmer.” In the main, trimmers worked with wires instead of mannequins, making clothes appear to hang, float or fly in mid air as if by magic. They habitually added in decorative additions such as dried foliage, flowers, ribbon, and all manner of things to tell a story.

Picture courtesy of Cloud Nine Pyjamas ..… Robyn hand made all the butterflies . Nice Trim!

Send me pictures of your window displays. Best Barbara

Buying Signals

smart ideas Barb pic

smart ideas Barb pic

When Buyers Are Ready To Buy,They Will Tell You. But Not With Words ...

They will, however, send loud non-verbal signals All you need to do is be able to read them! ...

Customer Signals:

When customers come into your sights, whether it is a retail store, at an exhibition or in any other environment, they will be sending you signals.

The Signals That They Send Will Include:

  • I am just wandering around with no real interest in products and intention to buy.

  • I am interested in this product, but am not currently anxious to buy.

  • I am very interested in this and might well buy it if you can answer a few questions.

  • I want to buy this, now!

When They Are Not Ready To Buy:

When a customer is not ready to buy, it does not mean that they will not buy, but it does mean that you will need a different approach. Do remember also that if there are many customers around, spending a lot of effort selling to one customer may mean that you miss out on a lot of other easier sales.

Avoiding Eye Contact With You:

When you look at them and they immediately look away, they probably do not need assistance right at this moment. Do watch what they are doing, because they may need some help soon.If they are handling a limited range of products, spending time looking at things, then it may be a good idea to stand nearby, relaxed and ready to help (not anxious and ready to pounce). When they look at you with a longer glance, move toward them. If they keep looking, keep moving in and start the sale.

Making 'Not Now' Excuses:

If they say 'just looking' or otherwise indicate that they don't need help, then make an encouraging remark to keep them looking and back off. Still keep an eye on them to see if their demeanour changes.

Casual Handling Of The Product:

customers-buying

customers-buying

If they are casually picking up different products and dropping them back, perhaps not tidily, it can be a big nuisance for you as you tidy up after them (when they have left) but this may well be a symbol of a bored browser. As ever, keep an eye on them so you can move in when they change how they are behaving.

Looking At Many Different Products:

If they are wandering around looking at almost random products, spending a similar short time on each one, then they may again be a relatively bored browser.

Moving Around Quickly:

When they are moving quite quickly around the place, they may be scanning for something or may be wandering. If they slow down, watch more carefully and move in when they are showing more signs of interest.

When They Are Ready To Buy:

 When the person is ready to buy, or at least they are showing some interest, then you should also be ready to pick them up and move them towards the final close.

Spending Time Looking At One Product Type:

When they are looking at one type of product, and especially if you have a broad range from which they are browsing only a small category, then they may well be interested in buying. Perhaps they need advice, so ask if you can help them decide.The longer a person looks at one product type, the more likely they are to buy it. They are investing their time, which is a sure sign of interest.

Looking Around For Somebody To Help Them:

If you see them looking around, catch their gaze, and perhaps raise your eyebrows a little to signal that you are ready to help. If they sustain the glance or raise their eyebrows too, move in to sell.This is particularly significant if they are holding the product or have just spend time looking at a limited product range.

the way you buy

the way you buy

Asking Questions About The Detail:

If, when you offer help, they get into more detail about the product, then they are likely to be becoming more interested.If they ask about the functionality of the product, they may well have a checklist of things they are seeking, so ask for details of what they are seeking. You can also ask more about how they will use the product, from which you can advice on the best buy for them.

Asking About Price:

This is a good buying signal. You can tell them the price or you can ask how much they are looking to spend today. If they tell you, then you can help them find the best value for the money they have to spend.

Using Possession Language:

When they pick up the product, they are getting a sense of owning it. This continues when they talk about how they will use the product -- which is a good reason for encourage this talk. Look for 'I' language. Get them to use it. Ask how they will use it. You can even talk about it as if they already own it, although be careful of being unsubtle and pushy.

Asking Another Person’s Opinion:

When they ask another person what they think about the product, they are likely thinking about buying the product and are seeking confirmation.You might thus find yourself selling it to the second person also. Think about this when you are making the initial sale -- include whoever else is there in the sales talking, though do watch for whether the main seller wants to be the main focus or appreciates others being included.

Body State Changes:

Any transition in non-verbal communication will typically signal a change in mental state that may well indicate readiness to buy. If they suddenly relax after asking questions or discussing the product, this may well signal that they have changed mental state. Other signals includes changes in body position, gesture, skin tone, style of talk and so on.

Touching The Money:

If they touch their wallet or purse and especially if they get out cash or credit card, this is a very strong signal for you. Get to them and ask if you can help. If they say they want to buy, just take their money (and do beware of 'un-selling' the product by your over-zealous and non-needed sales patter). Great info! Share this with your staff it's all part of improving their skills and knowledge on "How To  Sell more Effectively ". Need Sales Training for Your Staff? Contact me today!

Best Barbara

Check this list out! *10 Costly Mistakes Retail Sales Staff Make*

smart ideas Barb pic Are These Things Happening In Your Store?...  See A difference In Sales Within 7 Days & Nip These 10 Costly Mistakes In The Bud!

 


  
  1. Failing To Build Rapport With Customers. From a simple greeting to a little chat about niceties; non-sales-directed small-talk goes along way for developing an easier and more open mood within-your Customers.
  2. Failing To Find-Out The Requirements Of Your Customers.unnamed-2
  3. Focusing On Their Own Agenda Instead Of The Customers.
  4. Not Giving Customers Majority Of The Air Time.
  5. Confusing "Telling" with "Selling". Not listening nor hearing what Customer's are saying.
  6. Not Knowing The Prevailing Promotions, Specials Nor Regular Prices Of Products.
  7. Not Differentiating Product/ Service/ Store/ Company Enough To Create Additional Value In The Minds Of The Customer.
  8. Selling Too Fast.  Closing before the customer is ready to buy!
  9. Fail To Address Objections Properly.  Not realizing satisfactory resolutions of objectives are the Shortest Distance to Purchase.
  10. Not Taking Advantage Of Add-On-Sales. [fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="yes" overflow="visible"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"][As soon as the main purchase is done...] Introduce an additional product/service -when Customers are the most ready to entertain more items.

Related Links:

Best Practices To Increase Sales

Boost Your Christmas Sales

Best,

Barbara[/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Day #133 - Happy Canada Day

Canada celebrates it's Birthday

Celebrating Canada's  144th Birthday and the launch, in Canada, of Independent Retailer Month.

Celebrating Canadian Independent Retailers thru out the month of July. Take part; send us pictures and show Canada and the world how  you supported this inaugural event. We will post your pictures on our blog.

Independent Retailer Month is a global Shop Local campaign that runs throughout July to highlight the important role local merchant’s play in the community, economy and overall retail sector.In 2012 the global campaign expanded to Canada, led by me, Barbara Crowhurst,  CEO, Retail Makeover & Retail Web Design Services.


On Sunday July 29 . 2012 @ 7 .30 pm EST. We wrap up the month with a free 30 minute Online Live Workshop presentation on the 10 Reasons Consumers Love to Shop at Independent Retail Stores. Limited space available.  All  Independent Retailers welcome. For more information and for retailers to reserve an online seat contact  barbara@independentretailermonth.ca

Thank you in advance for your help.Look forward to hearing from you.Very Best;Proud to be CanadianBarbara

Day #132 - Independent Retailer Month Launches in Canada

Independent Retailer Month Launches in Canada July, 2012

What:

Independent Retailer Month is a global Shop Local campaign that runs throughout July to highlight the important role local merchant’s play in the community, economy and overall retail sector.

Who:

Co – founded by Kerry Bannigan, CEO Nolcha Fashion Week, and Tom Shay, principal of Profits Plus. Independent Retailer Month Canada is led by Barbara Crowhurst CEO Retail Makeover & Retail Makeover Web Design. Independent Retailer Month United Kingdom is led by Clare Rayner, The Retail Champion.

Where it all began:

Independent Retailer Month started life in the USA and was born from the collaboration of two very different individuals who share a common desire to salute independent retailers around the globe. In 2003, Tom Shay, principal of Profits Plus, created a holiday, 'National Independent Retailer Week', to show retailers how they could create celebrations for their communities, industries and own businesses.In 2009 Kerry Bannigan, Founder and CEO of Nolcha Fashion Week, devised ‘Independent Retail Week’, a week-long, city-wide, shopping extravaganza in New York, Chicago, Philadelphia and New Jersey advancing the business of independent fashion retailers. This initiative worked with over 300 retailers, garnered support from the city’s tourism boards, chambers of commerce and Mayor’s office; with features on NBC, Fox, ABC and CBS.Early 2011 discussions began between Bannigan and Shay as they wanted to be inclusive of everyone that had some form of recognition for independent retailing. July 2011 Independent Retailer Month USA was born with the goal to become a global campaign highlighting the important role local merchant’s play in the community, economy and overall retail sector. The campaign expanded to the United Kingdom led by Clare Rayner, The Retail Champion.In 2012 the global campaign expanded to Canada, led by Barbara Crowhurst CEO Retail Makeover & Retail Makeover WebDesign.

Independent Retailer Month Objectives:

  • Impact the independent retail sector globally with relevant support, expertise and insights
  • Connect consumers and communities to local retail merchants reminding them of the benefits of shopping local
  • Engage small business organizations, networks and thought leaders to demonstrate the importance of independent retail to the global, national and local economy

Boilerplate for media:

About Independent Retailer MonthIndependent Retailer Month is a global Shop Local campaign that runs throughout July to highlight the important role local merchant’s play in the community, economy and overall retail sector. Co – founded by Kerry Bannigan, CEO Nolcha Fashion Week, and Tom Shay, principal of Profits Plus, the initiative aims to impact the independent retail sector globally with relevant support, expertise and insights; connect consumers and communities to local retail merchants reminding them of the benefits of shopping local; and engage small business organizations, networks and thought leaders to demonstrate the importance of independent retail to the global, national and local economy. www.independentretailermonth.ca