7 Ways to Keep Retail Employees Happy

I found this information interesting, I am sure you will too!

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The employees you have working in your store are just as important (if not more important) than what you have in it. These people are the ones who have a direct effect on sales, customer satisfaction and ultimately the success of your store. So how can you keep them happy and encourage them to do even better?

1. Train them well

Are you thoroughly training your employees? Give them in-depth training so they can work to the best of their ability, and avoid frustrations and employee turnover. Show your employees that you are investing in them by retraining ones that have been with you for a while in more specialized areas.

2. Recognize them for doing good work

Affirmation of a job well done can go a long way. If your employees are doing well, tell them! The more someone hears about how they are doing a good job, the more it will make them want to go above and beyond in the future.

3. Give them incentives to do better

Consider offering bonuses or prizes to employees who are doing exceptionally well. You may also run contests to encourage harder work. This will boost employee/team morale and at the same time make your store a pleasurable work environment.

4. Ask for their input

Considering your employees are interacting with customers and selling your products or services, they are a goldmine of information. Show your employees that you value their expertise by asking for their input on how business is going.

5. Give them better tools for the job

Working with old and outdated equipment can make a job more cumbersome than it needs to be. Keep your staff happy and increase their productivity by investing in the equipment that they use on a regular basis. See what tools can be upgraded and replace them if necessary.

6. Avoid scheduling conflicts

There is no faster way to create an unhappy work environment with your employees than abusing their schedule. Remember your employees are real people and not disposable labor. As far as possible avoid last minute changes to the schedule,

7. Play games

Yes, your employees are there to work but there's no reason it can't be fun! Fun is motivational and so is competition. Combine the two into a retail sales game that meets company goals and watch your employees and sales thrive.

 Barbara

Performance Review -Tips For Managment

smart ideas Barb picPerformance Review Tips Are Beneficial To Managers!

 


  Strike the right balance between praise and constructive criticism to achieve that elusive balance and make the review a productive one, start preparing for the next round of performance appraisals once the last round has been completed. performance reviews If you’re dissatisfied with the reviews you’ve given in the past, take steps now to improve the process before other priorities and deadlines force you to put it on the back burner. Performance reviews are a lot like walking a tightrope. If you withhold positive feedback, you’ll discourage and demoralize employees. On the other hand, if you hesitate to point out problem areas, you’ll never see improvement. ...

   

Maintain A Consistent Review Schedule


Performance appraisals should not be a one-time event. In addition to providing ongoing feedback throughout the year, let employees know what time of year that reviews typically take place. Seventy-seven percent of employees polled said they consider performance reviews valuable, so providing them with adequate time to prepare is critical. Give your staff the opportunity to identify their achievements from the past year and areas where they would like to improve. 

Keep  Files On Each Employee


Whenever you hire a new staff member or immediately after your review the performance of a long-time employee, set up a file in which you will document the good, the bad and the just-average aspects of that employee’s job performance and work habits. You can use the file not only to catalog accomplishments but also to track performance-related issues such as tardiness or consistent failure to meet deadlines. By keeping a performance file on each staff member, you won’t have to rely on memory when you find you need to discuss something that occurred months before the actual review meeting. 

Solicit Third-Party Input


Although the appraisal will be based on your observations and assessments of an employee’s performance, you shouldn’t rely solely on your own perceptions – particularly if your interactions with the individual have been limited. Seek input from colleagues and others who work closely day-to-day with the employee. Inquire about the person’s strengths, weaknesses, areas that have improved over time and special abilities. Ask specific questions. For example, how does this employee handle challenges and overcome obstacles? What contributions has he or she made to team-based projects? Does the employee seem committed to continuing professional education and skills development? Compare the feedback you receive with what you’ve directly observed. 

Allow Sufficient Time To Make An Assessment


Don’t wait until the day before the review to start tracking and critiquing a staff member’s performance – this is unfair to the individual and will not give you an accurate, comprehensive picture of his or her abilities and achievements. Instead, try to observe the employee in a variety of situations over an extended period of time. Ideally, you want to see how well he or she manages both independent and collaborative assignments. 

Create A Conducive Setting


Choose a quiet, private place for the review and try to schedule it at a time when interruptions can be kept at a minimum. When structuring the session, incorporate time for a two-way dialogue so that the employee can respond to your feedback and offer input of his or her own. To prepare for the meeting, organize all documentation – previous evaluations,  comments you’ve gleaned from colleagues and your own notes. Give the employee sufficient advance notice so that he or she can also prepare. 

Performance Reviews

Set The Appropriate Tone


The review itself should be handled in a professional manner and treated as a conversation, not a lecture. Open the discussion by talking about the employee’s accomplishments and positive attributes. When it’s time to shift to negative or problematic areas, focus not on mistakes but on ways to improve performance. Most employees will not be surprised by anything they hear during a review. However, if there’s a gap between an employee’s perceived versus actual performance, be sure to explain the difference and suggest ways performance goals might be met. As you speak with the employee, invite comments on your observations. Once you’ve reviewed past performance, begin talking about future expectations. Clarify his or her job requirements and responsibilities as these can change over time. Also inquire about the employee’s professional development goals and discuss how you both might work toward meeting them. Throughout the meeting, be courteous and tactful. If you must criticize, focus on behaviour rather than personality. Remember that encouragement is the best incentive for improvement. 

Maintain An Open Door


Because employees may need time to digest the feedback from a review, encourage them to come to you afterward if they have questions or concerns. If you show that performance is not a once-a-year issue but a matter of ongoing importance, your staff will focus less on the formal review itself and more on the feedback and guidance they received. They’ll be motivated to see feedback as help with their performance. By preparing well in advance for performance reviews and developing a systematic, consistent appraisal process, you’ll turn what could be an uncomfortable time into a chance to dialogue with team members and set goals for the future. Who knows? You and your employees may start to look forward to these feedback sessions and your employee may improve.  BestBarbara

The Check Out Experience

smart ideas Barb picThe art of delivering a great checkout experience uses most of the same skills and behaviours required to work with Customers on the floor. ...    


   

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 Here are some tips for mastering Line-ology:

  • Always give your Customer your undivided attention.  Anyconversations with co-workers and others should wait until you have completed ringing up a sale.  The checkout process should be fast and efficient but at the same time must never make the Customer feel rushed.
  • Never interrupt another employee who is checking out a customer.  The number of managers who interrupt the cashier when he/she is working with a Customer always dismays me.  Unless it's an emergency it can wait.
  • Always greet your Customer in a friendly manner including a smile and eye contact. The eye contact is important because it establishes a stronger relationship in the short amount of time you're with the Customer.
  • Avoid overused questions like "How are you today?"  That is the "How may I help you" of checkouts.  Try to keep it more personal or about what the Customer is purchasing. "Are you enjoying this beautiful day?" or "Isn't that the cutest blouse?"
  • Try to acknowledge the next Customer in line while ringing up your current one.  That simple acknowledgment will demonstrate to the Customer that they are your priority and it will be keep them from getting annoyed by you talking with another Customer.

    ... Practicing the Art of Line-ology might be challenging for some, as one needs to multi-task while delivering a great experience.

  • Really hear what the customer is saying.  A lot of Customers indirectly voice pleasure or displeasure, and your ability to recognize and respond to what someone is saying without maybe quite saying can make a big difference to that Customer's experience.Example: A Customer might say, "The store is so busy it's difficult to get a dressing room."  Many employees would either not respond at all or agree with the Customer's statement.  The master of Line-ology will respond by saying, "Is there something you would like to try on?  I can set these aside and get someone to assist you."
  • Know that some of your hardest tasks are vital to your store's success.  Every time you capture a Customer's contact information you're creating future sales.  Take pride in your ability to capture that information. The same goes for doing required add-ons.  If your owner or manager has asked you to suggest an additional product, do it to the best of your ability.  Remember that almost everyone will say "no," the "no" is not personal, and enjoy those moments when the customer says "yes."  By the way, I'm not a huge fan of those types of add-ons, but to each their own.
  • At the end of each transaction look your Customer in the eye and say "Thank-You."  That brief moment of demonstrating your gratitude will stay with the Customer beyond their time in your store.  You may also, if appropriate, want to invite the Customer back.

    Lastly,.. If you're a Cashier, or occasionally checkout a Customer: Never underestimate how important you are to the success of the store.

    

Best,

Barb

 

Check this list out! *10 Costly Mistakes Retail Sales Staff Make*

smart ideas Barb pic Are These Things Happening In Your Store?...  See A difference In Sales Within 7 Days & Nip These 10 Costly Mistakes In The Bud!

 


  
  1. Failing To Build Rapport With Customers. From a simple greeting to a little chat about niceties; non-sales-directed small-talk goes along way for developing an easier and more open mood within-your Customers.
  2. Failing To Find-Out The Requirements Of Your Customers.unnamed-2
  3. Focusing On Their Own Agenda Instead Of The Customers.
  4. Not Giving Customers Majority Of The Air Time.
  5. Confusing "Telling" with "Selling". Not listening nor hearing what Customer's are saying.
  6. Not Knowing The Prevailing Promotions, Specials Nor Regular Prices Of Products.
  7. Not Differentiating Product/ Service/ Store/ Company Enough To Create Additional Value In The Minds Of The Customer.
  8. Selling Too Fast.  Closing before the customer is ready to buy!
  9. Fail To Address Objections Properly.  Not realizing satisfactory resolutions of objectives are the Shortest Distance to Purchase.
  10. Not Taking Advantage Of Add-On-Sales. [fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="yes" overflow="visible"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"][As soon as the main purchase is done...] Introduce an additional product/service -when Customers are the most ready to entertain more items.

Related Links:

Best Practices To Increase Sales

Boost Your Christmas Sales

Best,

Barbara[/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Day #150 - The Customer Experience

The Customer Experience

Key reasons shoppers choose to come back to your store and shop:It's all about your staff:

Action points for you to take to increase sales and margins:

  1. Increase the number of staff you have covering peek hours. More staff means  more customer attention and higher conversion rates.
  2. Invest in sales training.  A better trained sales staff provides the service that customers are looking for. A better trained staff  participate  more directly in the sales culture of the  store. Retail Makeover University Online
  3. Be the expert. A  knowledgeable staff  is what customers want. Product knowledge training is vital to your success.

Best;Barbara

Day #147 - Low-Cost Perks That Will Motivate Your Staff

In order to provide the "above and beyond" type of customer service a retail store should deliver to be successful, it must begin by creating happy employees. Retailers that develop long-term incentives, perks, and rewards for its staff often see benefits like less employee turn-over and better customer service. A combination which can lead to an increase in sales.What perks can a brick and mortar retailer offer employees? Here are some low-cost perk ideas for any retailer, large or small:1. Discounts on Merchandise: This perk may be the easiest for a retailer to establish. Offer workers a small percentage off on any product you sell.2. Company Parties: Holidays, inventory, or exceeding sales goals are all good times to throw a party. Plan the party away from the store or host a small gathering in the break room.3. Personal Time: Show your generosity by allowing parents off work when school is out for teacher in-service or other holidays. Personal days off shouldn't be confused with vacation time.4. Event Tickets: Businesses often receive promotions on discounted on shows, sporting events and even movie tickets. Give these event tickets to your staff as rewards or incentives for meeting sales goals.5. Free Food: Who doesn't like to eat? This favorite low-cost perk can be as simple as bringing in donuts, or bagels, a few times each month. Some retailers even buy lunch every Friday for scheduled staff.6. Time Off for Charity: Providing time off for staff to participate in charity events not only shows goodwill towards workers, but it also helps build community involvement.7. Random Acts of Kindness: Not all perks need to be planned. A simple recognition of a job well-done can go far in improving employee morale.

Give Them What They Really Want

As you create benefits and perks for your staff, be sure they are relevant and appropriate for your staff. You may feel you're being generous when you buy pizza for employees staying late the night before inventory, but they may not see it that way. An extra day off or allowing the worker to come in later one day may be a better offering of goodwill instead.The best way to know what your staff would prefer is to simply ask them. Make a point during the next  store meeting to take ideas and suggestions for perks they would like to receive. You may be surprised to learn it is some simple perk you can easily implement in your retail shop.Best;Barbara

Day #135 - Entrepreneurs Are On The Hunt

Entrepreneurs Are On The Hunt For Good Staff.

 I was directed to this information by one of my clients .Love what Sophie Bond's strategy is in recruiting good people. It's about hiring people with great attitudes and strong people skills.Read on….  Link to whole articleBest;Barbara[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="yes" overflow="visible"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"][social_share] [/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Day #131 - Working With Members Of Your Family

"Working with family members has the potential to be a very trying, sticky and challenging situation. It can bring out the best in you and your relatives--and also the worst in your working relationships. It can cause you to minimize or overlook errors or omissions that your relative commits, or it can make you excessively hypercritical and condescending. Just why does this happen? Working with family members is difficult for any number of reasons:

  • You know so much about the other person--you've been privy to intimate information about them.
  • You've most likely had arguments or negative conflicts with them.
  • You have years of experiences with them, both positive and negative.
  • You know the other person's "hot and cold buttons," the thoughts, feelings and behaviors that reward, cajole and pacify, or punish, threaten and dismiss the other person.
  • Maybe you don't like your relative or, conversely, you're very close with that person, which means you could either be overly critical or overly protective of them.
  • You may provide too much supervision or teamwork--or you may provide too little.

As a result of the knowledge and closeness you have with this other person, you may find it difficult to be rational, logical, accurate or fair with your thoughts, feelings and behaviors when it comes to interacting with that person. Your relationship with them--both at work and in your personal life--is probably suffering.So how do you begin to correct the situation? First, you need to approach the other person and acknowledge that the current relationship isn't working optimally, that something is either "too right" or "too wrong," too positive or too negative. Then you need to discuss the impact your behaviors or attitudes are having on other employees and the company as a whole. Third, you need to agree to meet together . Fourth, it's important that you both agree that you're going to work together to improve and maximize the current relationship for your own sake as well as the sake of the organization.Next, you both need to agree that you want to work toward making the working atmosphere more professional and less personal. You have to agree not to allow your personal feelings, either positive or negative, to enter into the work place. But be warned: These tactics will only work if you empower someone you trust, including another relative, to step in and stop actions that appear to be based on irrational feelings, either positive and negative (in other words, actions that you're taking that overlook or are overly critical of your relative's behaviour).Sixth, you need to clarify the specific goals each of you agrees to meet so that behaviors and attitudes are directed toward meeting the company's goals and mission. Ensure that any statement of goals you create is specific, can be measured and assessed, and can be successfully achieved.The next step is to make sure that your roles are carefully, objectively, rationally and completely described to ensure optimal clarity by all individuals for all roles. This is an especially critical step because it's very common that working relationships fall apart when this step has not been taken. When employees at any level are  confused about "who is responsible for what," conflict and misunderstandings result, and productivity, employee satisfaction and customer satisfaction all decrease. To avoid this morass, you must spend time working on making each individual's explicit obligations. This facet of working together refers not only to each person's tasks and responsibilities, but also to each person's reporting relationships and source of power and influence, including their time, salary and bonuses, employees and equipment.The eighth tip is to clarify the work processes that will be used on a daily basis: the process for making decisions, including who can make what kind of decisions, who is involved in these steps, and how decisions are to be made (by an individual, a pair or small group). Another process to consider is how to communicate with others and, in particular, which others. Basically, this aspect refers to just who is included in the communications loop and why. Are all the key players to be kept up to date about occurrences? Are key people being left out of the communications loop for reasons of power or jealousy? Are inappropriate people being brought into the loop for reasons of patronage?The ninth tip is to build trust. Start by acknowledging the current situation. You'll be appreciated and valued for discussing a topic that others know about but are reluctant to bring up. Make sure that others can trust what you're saying and doing by backing up your thoughts and actions with clarity and explanations. Then, when you make a commitment to change the status quo, do what you're saying and say what you're doing. Make sure your actions speak for themselves, and when they don't, offer clear explanations. In addition, act with integrity, honesty and truthfulness in all that you do.Above all, make certain that you're competent in all that you do. Ensure that you have the knowledge, skills and abilities to perform at a high level. If you don't, get some training, find a mentor, or redesign your tasks and responsibilities to align them with what you do best. Nothing destroys trust faster than incompetence. As you can see, trust is potentially the strongest element in any relationship. Without it, organizations fall apart.The tenth and final tip involves showing the positive quality of interpersonal relationships. Just because you're related to someone doesn't mean you need to love them or worship them, especially on the job. Nor does it mean that the company is a playground for working out family problems. What is required is that you demonstrate respect for other people, especially your relatives. You needn't be fawning or ostentatious with your praise or criticism of them, but you do need to be professional and appropriate, whatever the true nature of your feelings and attitudes toward others, especially family".Posted with love and respect for the challenges that face members  of families that work together.BestBarbara

Day #123 - Easy Ways To Reward Your Staff

I loved this information and had to share it with you:

" One of the bigger challenges of being a manager or business owner is figuring out how to motivate and reward your employees. One of the key points in effectively managing human resources is to catch people doing something right and tell them about it immediately. It takes some work to recognize and properly reward your staff. The payoff can be huge – in a highly motivated and loyal crew that enjoys their work enough to become long-term employees that represent you and your business well. You may also find that you have created a culture where people are eager to apply to work for you because of your reputation of treating employees well.Here are a  few suggestions on ways you can reward your staff – without breaking the bank.On a daily basis you can try to greet every person by name and with a genuine smile. You want your employees to know that you value their place in your organization. Getting personally involved has limits but a simple; “I hope your dog is doing better after his surgery” or “I’m sorry your son was sick and missed school yesterday” shows compassion and interest and means a lot to a person. Take every opportunity to praise them in public. A little goes a long way. It takes a little planning and preparation but rewarding your employees does not have to be expensive. Being effective may require a concerted effort and a time commitment but the effort does pay off. "

Easy Ways to Reward Your Staff

Say thanks:• Smile• Discounts for staff• Promote from within• Give credit• Birthday cards• Bring treats• Movie passes• Buy a soda• Lunch with the boss• Staff uniforms• Newsletter recognition• Send to conferences• Special parking place• Employee of the month• Day off• Free massage• Casual dress day• Book or magazine• CD or tape• Nominate them for an award• Wash their car• Have a contest• Ask for their advice• Gift certificates• Name an award in their honor• Photo on the wall of fame• Thank you card• Boss for a day• Make a button• Pat on the back• Handshake• Bottle of water• Special coupon• Listen• E-mail a thank youAs always;BestBarbara

Day #94 - New Staff Training

What training is essential for new staff?

Read what I shared with my Retail News readers.[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="yes" overflow="visible"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"]"Barbara Crowhurst"[/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]