7 Ways to Keep Retail Employees Happy

I found this information interesting, I am sure you will too!

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The employees you have working in your store are just as important (if not more important) than what you have in it. These people are the ones who have a direct effect on sales, customer satisfaction and ultimately the success of your store. So how can you keep them happy and encourage them to do even better?

1. Train them well

Are you thoroughly training your employees? Give them in-depth training so they can work to the best of their ability, and avoid frustrations and employee turnover. Show your employees that you are investing in them by retraining ones that have been with you for a while in more specialized areas.

2. Recognize them for doing good work

Affirmation of a job well done can go a long way. If your employees are doing well, tell them! The more someone hears about how they are doing a good job, the more it will make them want to go above and beyond in the future.

3. Give them incentives to do better

Consider offering bonuses or prizes to employees who are doing exceptionally well. You may also run contests to encourage harder work. This will boost employee/team morale and at the same time make your store a pleasurable work environment.

4. Ask for their input

Considering your employees are interacting with customers and selling your products or services, they are a goldmine of information. Show your employees that you value their expertise by asking for their input on how business is going.

5. Give them better tools for the job

Working with old and outdated equipment can make a job more cumbersome than it needs to be. Keep your staff happy and increase their productivity by investing in the equipment that they use on a regular basis. See what tools can be upgraded and replace them if necessary.

6. Avoid scheduling conflicts

There is no faster way to create an unhappy work environment with your employees than abusing their schedule. Remember your employees are real people and not disposable labor. As far as possible avoid last minute changes to the schedule,

7. Play games

Yes, your employees are there to work but there's no reason it can't be fun! Fun is motivational and so is competition. Combine the two into a retail sales game that meets company goals and watch your employees and sales thrive.

 Barbara

Performance Review -Tips For Managment

smart ideas Barb picPerformance Review Tips Are Beneficial To Managers!

 


  Strike the right balance between praise and constructive criticism to achieve that elusive balance and make the review a productive one, start preparing for the next round of performance appraisals once the last round has been completed. performance reviews If you’re dissatisfied with the reviews you’ve given in the past, take steps now to improve the process before other priorities and deadlines force you to put it on the back burner. Performance reviews are a lot like walking a tightrope. If you withhold positive feedback, you’ll discourage and demoralize employees. On the other hand, if you hesitate to point out problem areas, you’ll never see improvement. ...

   

Maintain A Consistent Review Schedule


Performance appraisals should not be a one-time event. In addition to providing ongoing feedback throughout the year, let employees know what time of year that reviews typically take place. Seventy-seven percent of employees polled said they consider performance reviews valuable, so providing them with adequate time to prepare is critical. Give your staff the opportunity to identify their achievements from the past year and areas where they would like to improve. 

Keep  Files On Each Employee


Whenever you hire a new staff member or immediately after your review the performance of a long-time employee, set up a file in which you will document the good, the bad and the just-average aspects of that employee’s job performance and work habits. You can use the file not only to catalog accomplishments but also to track performance-related issues such as tardiness or consistent failure to meet deadlines. By keeping a performance file on each staff member, you won’t have to rely on memory when you find you need to discuss something that occurred months before the actual review meeting. 

Solicit Third-Party Input


Although the appraisal will be based on your observations and assessments of an employee’s performance, you shouldn’t rely solely on your own perceptions – particularly if your interactions with the individual have been limited. Seek input from colleagues and others who work closely day-to-day with the employee. Inquire about the person’s strengths, weaknesses, areas that have improved over time and special abilities. Ask specific questions. For example, how does this employee handle challenges and overcome obstacles? What contributions has he or she made to team-based projects? Does the employee seem committed to continuing professional education and skills development? Compare the feedback you receive with what you’ve directly observed. 

Allow Sufficient Time To Make An Assessment


Don’t wait until the day before the review to start tracking and critiquing a staff member’s performance – this is unfair to the individual and will not give you an accurate, comprehensive picture of his or her abilities and achievements. Instead, try to observe the employee in a variety of situations over an extended period of time. Ideally, you want to see how well he or she manages both independent and collaborative assignments. 

Create A Conducive Setting


Choose a quiet, private place for the review and try to schedule it at a time when interruptions can be kept at a minimum. When structuring the session, incorporate time for a two-way dialogue so that the employee can respond to your feedback and offer input of his or her own. To prepare for the meeting, organize all documentation – previous evaluations,  comments you’ve gleaned from colleagues and your own notes. Give the employee sufficient advance notice so that he or she can also prepare. 

Performance Reviews

Set The Appropriate Tone


The review itself should be handled in a professional manner and treated as a conversation, not a lecture. Open the discussion by talking about the employee’s accomplishments and positive attributes. When it’s time to shift to negative or problematic areas, focus not on mistakes but on ways to improve performance. Most employees will not be surprised by anything they hear during a review. However, if there’s a gap between an employee’s perceived versus actual performance, be sure to explain the difference and suggest ways performance goals might be met. As you speak with the employee, invite comments on your observations. Once you’ve reviewed past performance, begin talking about future expectations. Clarify his or her job requirements and responsibilities as these can change over time. Also inquire about the employee’s professional development goals and discuss how you both might work toward meeting them. Throughout the meeting, be courteous and tactful. If you must criticize, focus on behaviour rather than personality. Remember that encouragement is the best incentive for improvement. 

Maintain An Open Door


Because employees may need time to digest the feedback from a review, encourage them to come to you afterward if they have questions or concerns. If you show that performance is not a once-a-year issue but a matter of ongoing importance, your staff will focus less on the formal review itself and more on the feedback and guidance they received. They’ll be motivated to see feedback as help with their performance. By preparing well in advance for performance reviews and developing a systematic, consistent appraisal process, you’ll turn what could be an uncomfortable time into a chance to dialogue with team members and set goals for the future. Who knows? You and your employees may start to look forward to these feedback sessions and your employee may improve.  BestBarbara

Day #23 - Job Description For Retail Store Greeter

If it doesn't make sense to hire a greeter for your store, rotate these duties  to all your staff.[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="yes" overflow="visible"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"]This descriptor will give you an idea what the greeter 's job is.Click for a copy of a Store Greeter job description.Barbara[/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Day #6 - Let Your Staff Do Their Jobs

Let the people that work for you do their jobs. Here is the list of duties for a sales associate.

General Purpose of Position:

A Sales Associate is responsible for maintaining outstanding customer service as per Company standards, generating sales, merchandising, and safeguarding company assets.

Tasks and Responsibilities:

  • Ensure that each customer receives outstanding service by providing a friendly environment, which includes #the old waygreeting and acknowledging every customer, maintaining solid product knowledge and all other aspects of customer service.
  • Maintain an awareness of all promotions and advertisements.
  • Assist in floor moves, merchandising, display maintenance, and housekeeping.
  • Assist in processing and replenishing merchandise and monitoring floor stock.
  • Aid customers in locating merchandise.
  • Communicate customer requests to management.
  • Assist in completing price changes within the department.
  • Participate in year-end inventory and cycle counts.
  • Assist in ringing up sales at registers and/or bagging merchandise.
  • Any other tasks as assigned from time to time by any manager.

Skills and Competencies:

  • Ability to operate all equipment necessary to perform the job.
  • #the new wayAbility to communicate with associates and customers.
  • Ability to read, count, and write to accurately complete all documentation.

Requirements:

  • Physical ability to stand for extended periods, and to move and handle boxes of merchandise and fixtures throughout the store, which entails lifting, and perform all functions as set forth above.
  • Ability to work varied hours/days, including nights, weekends, and holidays as needed.

Barbara

Do you know what your Job Description is?

This is for Store Owners and Retail Managers

Do you know what your Job Description is?

Are you ready for your Retail Makeover and manage your business more effectively?  Do you know what your job description is? I know how challenging it is to manage a retail specialty store. I want you to be the best retail store owner or manager you can be. Here is what I need you to do, you must set aside 5 hours a week to review, plan and assess what you are doing with your business.  I know this seems like a lot of time. Most businesses start to  fail because owners do not spend  this time each week.  Do not pick your home to do this work in because  you will be sucked into the dramas that are taking place there and you more then likely will not focus in on the work I need you to do. Your office at the store also may not be the best place because when you are  there your staff will always get you involved in what's happening in the store and interrupt your Retail  Makeover Store Planning Time.

Your Job Description:

The main focus of any retail manager or owners' job is to improve the commercial performance of the store by increasing its turnover and maximizing profitability. Achieving performance objectives will require action in one of the main areas of retail activity: store operations; human resources, finance, buying, customer care, marketing, logistics, information technology, and administration. Major parts of the job on a day-to-day basis include managing staff, finding new ways to improve sales, and meeting customer demands.

Typical work activities:
  1. managing and motivating a team to increase sales and ensure efficiency
  2. managing stock levels and making key decisions about stock control
  3. analyzing sales figures and forecasting future sales volumes to maximize profits
  4. analyzing and interpreting trends to facilitate planning
  5. using information technology to record sales figures and for data analysis and forward planning
  6. dealing with staffing issues; interviewing potential staff, conducting appraisals and performance reviews, and providing or organizing training and development
  7. ensuring standards for quality, customer service and health and safety are met
  8. resolving health and safety, legal and security issues
  9. responding to customer complaints and comments
  10. promoting the organization
  11. organizing special promotions, displays and events
  12. attending and chairing meetings
  13. updating colleagues on business performance, new initiatives and other pertinent issues
  14. touring the sales floor regularly, talking to staff and customers, and identifying or resolving urgent issues
  15. maintaining awareness of market trends in the retail industry, understanding forthcoming customer initiatives, and monitoring what local competitors are doing
  16. initiating changes to improve the business, e.g. revising opening hours to ensure the store can compete effectively in the local market
  17. dealing with sales, as and when required

Do you see yourself in this list? Focusing on the above  is important.  Stop doing your employees work . I'll send you your staff job description next week.My last thought for you -  if you have been thinking about  enrolling in my Retail Makeover Business Planning Program, do it today. Let's get started  and right size your business.Till next time. Have a great sales week.Best ,Barbara