Why Selfies Need to Be Part of Your Marketing Strategy

why-selfies-need-to-be-part-of-your-marketing-strategy-moltz-open-forum-hembed.jpg

Since visuals continue to drive customer engagement all small businesses need to take advantage of the selfie phenomenon. Sharing these types of photos can help a company connect its brand identity to customers. How can you use selfies in your marketing strategy?According to Research this word has been around since 2004 when the selfie hashtags first appeared on Twitter. Taking this type of self-portrait became easier when in 2010, Apple introduced a front facing camera on its iPhone.Since visuals continue to drive customer engagement all small businesses need to take advantage of the selfie phenomenon. Sharing these types of photos can help a company connect its brand identity to customers. How can you use selfies in your marketing strategy? Show personality. Customers traditionally rank authenticity as a top trait they seek when doing business with any company. Selfies by their very nature are personal. Their content usually says a lot about the people who work at the company. They are much more effective for connecting to customers than posed photographs. For example, a selfie of employees at the office or a related event can be a powerful message that says, “We like to work here, and we support the company’s mission.” Become human. It is much easier to connect with a person than an abstract concept like a company. Posting employee selfies shows that there are real people behind the brand. This helps create a powerful emotional connection for anyone considering the company’s product. Customers value transparency, and selfies can accomplish this. Remember, prospects buy from whom they know, like and trust. Selfies can strengthen these factors. Give social proof. When customers post selfies with a company’s product, this is the social proof or recommendation that other prospects crave. It acts as a perfect advertisement, since it's not from the company. Logically, customers do not pose with products they do not like. Share a laugh. Humor can be used to promote almost any brand, and funny photos have a greater chance of spreading around the Web. Ask employees and customers to ham it up when they are in front of a camera. Encourage customers to submit selfies by having a contest and rewarding them with prizes. Tie these photos to a Twitter or Instagram hashtag or have a specific Facebook page or Pinterest board for the contest. The selfie risk. Pictures can get posted that a company doesn’t want associated with its brand. While you can edit selfies posted to your company's site and social media pages, you can't control what other people are posting to their sites. Your best defense is to be aware of what's out there. Wishing you every success.

Performance Review -Tips For Managment

smart ideas Barb picPerformance Review Tips Are Beneficial To Managers!

 


  Strike the right balance between praise and constructive criticism to achieve that elusive balance and make the review a productive one, start preparing for the next round of performance appraisals once the last round has been completed. performance reviews If you’re dissatisfied with the reviews you’ve given in the past, take steps now to improve the process before other priorities and deadlines force you to put it on the back burner. Performance reviews are a lot like walking a tightrope. If you withhold positive feedback, you’ll discourage and demoralize employees. On the other hand, if you hesitate to point out problem areas, you’ll never see improvement. ...

   

Maintain A Consistent Review Schedule


Performance appraisals should not be a one-time event. In addition to providing ongoing feedback throughout the year, let employees know what time of year that reviews typically take place. Seventy-seven percent of employees polled said they consider performance reviews valuable, so providing them with adequate time to prepare is critical. Give your staff the opportunity to identify their achievements from the past year and areas where they would like to improve. 

Keep  Files On Each Employee


Whenever you hire a new staff member or immediately after your review the performance of a long-time employee, set up a file in which you will document the good, the bad and the just-average aspects of that employee’s job performance and work habits. You can use the file not only to catalog accomplishments but also to track performance-related issues such as tardiness or consistent failure to meet deadlines. By keeping a performance file on each staff member, you won’t have to rely on memory when you find you need to discuss something that occurred months before the actual review meeting. 

Solicit Third-Party Input


Although the appraisal will be based on your observations and assessments of an employee’s performance, you shouldn’t rely solely on your own perceptions – particularly if your interactions with the individual have been limited. Seek input from colleagues and others who work closely day-to-day with the employee. Inquire about the person’s strengths, weaknesses, areas that have improved over time and special abilities. Ask specific questions. For example, how does this employee handle challenges and overcome obstacles? What contributions has he or she made to team-based projects? Does the employee seem committed to continuing professional education and skills development? Compare the feedback you receive with what you’ve directly observed. 

Allow Sufficient Time To Make An Assessment


Don’t wait until the day before the review to start tracking and critiquing a staff member’s performance – this is unfair to the individual and will not give you an accurate, comprehensive picture of his or her abilities and achievements. Instead, try to observe the employee in a variety of situations over an extended period of time. Ideally, you want to see how well he or she manages both independent and collaborative assignments. 

Create A Conducive Setting


Choose a quiet, private place for the review and try to schedule it at a time when interruptions can be kept at a minimum. When structuring the session, incorporate time for a two-way dialogue so that the employee can respond to your feedback and offer input of his or her own. To prepare for the meeting, organize all documentation – previous evaluations,  comments you’ve gleaned from colleagues and your own notes. Give the employee sufficient advance notice so that he or she can also prepare. 

Performance Reviews

Set The Appropriate Tone


The review itself should be handled in a professional manner and treated as a conversation, not a lecture. Open the discussion by talking about the employee’s accomplishments and positive attributes. When it’s time to shift to negative or problematic areas, focus not on mistakes but on ways to improve performance. Most employees will not be surprised by anything they hear during a review. However, if there’s a gap between an employee’s perceived versus actual performance, be sure to explain the difference and suggest ways performance goals might be met. As you speak with the employee, invite comments on your observations. Once you’ve reviewed past performance, begin talking about future expectations. Clarify his or her job requirements and responsibilities as these can change over time. Also inquire about the employee’s professional development goals and discuss how you both might work toward meeting them. Throughout the meeting, be courteous and tactful. If you must criticize, focus on behaviour rather than personality. Remember that encouragement is the best incentive for improvement. 

Maintain An Open Door


Because employees may need time to digest the feedback from a review, encourage them to come to you afterward if they have questions or concerns. If you show that performance is not a once-a-year issue but a matter of ongoing importance, your staff will focus less on the formal review itself and more on the feedback and guidance they received. They’ll be motivated to see feedback as help with their performance. By preparing well in advance for performance reviews and developing a systematic, consistent appraisal process, you’ll turn what could be an uncomfortable time into a chance to dialogue with team members and set goals for the future. Who knows? You and your employees may start to look forward to these feedback sessions and your employee may improve.  BestBarbara

Buying Signals

smart ideas Barb pic

smart ideas Barb pic

When Buyers Are Ready To Buy,They Will Tell You. But Not With Words ...

They will, however, send loud non-verbal signals All you need to do is be able to read them! ...

Customer Signals:

When customers come into your sights, whether it is a retail store, at an exhibition or in any other environment, they will be sending you signals.

The Signals That They Send Will Include:

  • I am just wandering around with no real interest in products and intention to buy.

  • I am interested in this product, but am not currently anxious to buy.

  • I am very interested in this and might well buy it if you can answer a few questions.

  • I want to buy this, now!

When They Are Not Ready To Buy:

When a customer is not ready to buy, it does not mean that they will not buy, but it does mean that you will need a different approach. Do remember also that if there are many customers around, spending a lot of effort selling to one customer may mean that you miss out on a lot of other easier sales.

Avoiding Eye Contact With You:

When you look at them and they immediately look away, they probably do not need assistance right at this moment. Do watch what they are doing, because they may need some help soon.If they are handling a limited range of products, spending time looking at things, then it may be a good idea to stand nearby, relaxed and ready to help (not anxious and ready to pounce). When they look at you with a longer glance, move toward them. If they keep looking, keep moving in and start the sale.

Making 'Not Now' Excuses:

If they say 'just looking' or otherwise indicate that they don't need help, then make an encouraging remark to keep them looking and back off. Still keep an eye on them to see if their demeanour changes.

Casual Handling Of The Product:

customers-buying

customers-buying

If they are casually picking up different products and dropping them back, perhaps not tidily, it can be a big nuisance for you as you tidy up after them (when they have left) but this may well be a symbol of a bored browser. As ever, keep an eye on them so you can move in when they change how they are behaving.

Looking At Many Different Products:

If they are wandering around looking at almost random products, spending a similar short time on each one, then they may again be a relatively bored browser.

Moving Around Quickly:

When they are moving quite quickly around the place, they may be scanning for something or may be wandering. If they slow down, watch more carefully and move in when they are showing more signs of interest.

When They Are Ready To Buy:

 When the person is ready to buy, or at least they are showing some interest, then you should also be ready to pick them up and move them towards the final close.

Spending Time Looking At One Product Type:

When they are looking at one type of product, and especially if you have a broad range from which they are browsing only a small category, then they may well be interested in buying. Perhaps they need advice, so ask if you can help them decide.The longer a person looks at one product type, the more likely they are to buy it. They are investing their time, which is a sure sign of interest.

Looking Around For Somebody To Help Them:

If you see them looking around, catch their gaze, and perhaps raise your eyebrows a little to signal that you are ready to help. If they sustain the glance or raise their eyebrows too, move in to sell.This is particularly significant if they are holding the product or have just spend time looking at a limited product range.

the way you buy

the way you buy

Asking Questions About The Detail:

If, when you offer help, they get into more detail about the product, then they are likely to be becoming more interested.If they ask about the functionality of the product, they may well have a checklist of things they are seeking, so ask for details of what they are seeking. You can also ask more about how they will use the product, from which you can advice on the best buy for them.

Asking About Price:

This is a good buying signal. You can tell them the price or you can ask how much they are looking to spend today. If they tell you, then you can help them find the best value for the money they have to spend.

Using Possession Language:

When they pick up the product, they are getting a sense of owning it. This continues when they talk about how they will use the product -- which is a good reason for encourage this talk. Look for 'I' language. Get them to use it. Ask how they will use it. You can even talk about it as if they already own it, although be careful of being unsubtle and pushy.

Asking Another Person’s Opinion:

When they ask another person what they think about the product, they are likely thinking about buying the product and are seeking confirmation.You might thus find yourself selling it to the second person also. Think about this when you are making the initial sale -- include whoever else is there in the sales talking, though do watch for whether the main seller wants to be the main focus or appreciates others being included.

Body State Changes:

Any transition in non-verbal communication will typically signal a change in mental state that may well indicate readiness to buy. If they suddenly relax after asking questions or discussing the product, this may well signal that they have changed mental state. Other signals includes changes in body position, gesture, skin tone, style of talk and so on.

Touching The Money:

If they touch their wallet or purse and especially if they get out cash or credit card, this is a very strong signal for you. Get to them and ask if you can help. If they say they want to buy, just take their money (and do beware of 'un-selling' the product by your over-zealous and non-needed sales patter). Great info! Share this with your staff it's all part of improving their skills and knowledge on "How To  Sell more Effectively ". Need Sales Training for Your Staff? Contact me today!

Best Barbara

The Evolution of Customer Service in Family Owned Businesses

smart ideas Barb picI came a cross an informative article, while browsing on LinkedIn I know will resonate with a handful of my readers. Do you own a family run business? Considering your options?

Either-way this is a must read!

 


Remember the good old days when continued Customer purchases were usually yours unless you didn’t fix a problem… 1st Generation Family Run Business Owners businesses grow from:

passing the baton

  • Investing long hours of hard work and detailed attention to Customers

  • Getting to know Customers through long conversations over dinners!

  • Loyal Customers would tell business owners when something was wrong.

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  • These Customers would complain, even make a suggestion! And wait expecting to hear back from the owner, to tell them exactly how the problem would be remedied -then offer a discount or tangible evidence that the loyalty is appreciated!

  • Lastly, where the business is Family-Run often you’ll find the 1st Generation Owners calling up the 2nd Generation (Employees) to demand that Customers problems are fixed immediately -Not just when “[fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="yes" overflow="visible"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"][they] get around to it”.

   

Learn more, here's the Link...

The Evolution of Customer Service in Family Owned Businesses

Best,

Barb

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Check this list out! *10 Costly Mistakes Retail Sales Staff Make*

smart ideas Barb pic Are These Things Happening In Your Store?...  See A difference In Sales Within 7 Days & Nip These 10 Costly Mistakes In The Bud!

 


  
  1. Failing To Build Rapport With Customers. From a simple greeting to a little chat about niceties; non-sales-directed small-talk goes along way for developing an easier and more open mood within-your Customers.
  2. Failing To Find-Out The Requirements Of Your Customers.unnamed-2
  3. Focusing On Their Own Agenda Instead Of The Customers.
  4. Not Giving Customers Majority Of The Air Time.
  5. Confusing "Telling" with "Selling". Not listening nor hearing what Customer's are saying.
  6. Not Knowing The Prevailing Promotions, Specials Nor Regular Prices Of Products.
  7. Not Differentiating Product/ Service/ Store/ Company Enough To Create Additional Value In The Minds Of The Customer.
  8. Selling Too Fast.  Closing before the customer is ready to buy!
  9. Fail To Address Objections Properly.  Not realizing satisfactory resolutions of objectives are the Shortest Distance to Purchase.
  10. Not Taking Advantage Of Add-On-Sales. [fusion_builder_container hundred_percent="yes" overflow="visible"][fusion_builder_row][fusion_builder_column type="1_1" background_position="left top" background_color="" border_size="" border_color="" border_style="solid" spacing="yes" background_image="" background_repeat="no-repeat" padding="" margin_top="0px" margin_bottom="0px" class="" id="" animation_type="" animation_speed="0.3" animation_direction="left" hide_on_mobile="no" center_content="no" min_height="none"][As soon as the main purchase is done...] Introduce an additional product/service -when Customers are the most ready to entertain more items.

Related Links:

Best Practices To Increase Sales

Boost Your Christmas Sales

Best,

Barbara[/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container]

Day #30 - Customer Feedback

Recently I read a survey that had tracked information on consumers shopping habits . Here's the ugly truth, 67% of consumers polled completely left, or didn’t return to a store because of perceived apathy.  Stores seemingly or actually not caring about them as a customer."customer surveys"That got me thinking about the whole customer experience and the importance of the real connection between you the retail owner and your customers. The relationship.Service quality is your #1 concern it’s part of the whole customer experience. Retail consumers measure you in the market place and against your competition.In my daily practice, as Retail Makeover Coach, I’m often asked the question, “How does a retailer find out what the customer experience is in their store?”The best and easiest way is to ask. Why I want you to do surveys is that it gets you in front of your customer. You get to hear what they think. So what do you ask your customers?

Key Questions For Your Customers:

  1. Where do you live?
  2. How often do they come to this general area to shop?
  3. How often do they come into your store?
  4. Do they shop for themselves or for gifts?
  5. Do they like your store set up?
  6. Is it easy to find things and to move from one place to another?
  7. Do you carry the products they like?
  8. Would they like to see something added to your product mix?
  9. How is your staff? Friendly, knowledgeable, available to help
  10. Store appearance?
  11. How would they rate your customer care?
  12. Product displays?
  13. Overall shopping experience?
  14. Would they recommend your store to friends and family?
  15. Would they like to receive your monthly newsletter?

I believe in regular surveys being done. One a year is a must. You should be able to handle this yourself. Create the form and do the leg work."customer surveys"Surveys can be administered in many different ways: in store, on line, your monthly newsletter, mailed to your customers home or place of business or by phone. You choose what works best for you. Use a rating system 1-10, 10 being exceptional and 1 very poor.In getting ready for this blog, I went into different retail stores to pick up their customer care cards. From formats that just ask. How are we doing? Leaving me endless lines to write - to surveys that were full of questions with boxes to tick off. There where on line surveys with a contest attached to it. Or mail me back surveys with a coupon attached to them. So lots of different approached.As a thank you, you may want to give an in-store coupon for $10, it’s a nice gesture and the customer gets to spend the coupon in your store.So what do you do with the info you get? You react to it and act on it. If after you do the survey you don’t know how to assess what you need to do. Please contact me  - It will be my pleasure to help you.Barbara